Macau Days

JOIN US AT MPAVILLION ON TUESDAY 14 NOVEMBER 5:30-6:30pm

MTALKS: BRIAN CASTRO & JOHN YOUNG IN CONVERSATION WITH NATALIE KING

Macau has undergone major shifts over the past 500 years. From merchant port of refuge and gateway for Jesuit missionaries to a 20th-century modernist Portuguese province—it has always been a place traversed by poets and artists. The Macau of today is a phantasmagoric site for gambling that rivals Las Vegas.

Come down to MPavilion for an enlightening conversation between artist John Young, novelist Brian Castro and writer/curator Natalie King to celebrate the launch of Macau Days, a tri-lingual publication including poetic texts by Brian Castro and artworks by John Young, as well as classic Macanese recipes designed to engage shared histories of Macau. Natalie will draw from her experiences fostering numerous projects throughout Asia to lead a discussion about art, poetry, food and fiction.

This event is in partnership with the J.M. Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice and the EU Centre for Global Affairs, University of Adelaide.

 

MACAU DAYS

Artist: John Young 
Poet: Brian Castro 
Additional texts: Edward Colless and Paul Carter 

ISBN 978-0-9953925-2-6 
187 pages | Hardcover | B&W and colour images 
277mm H x 220mm W 
RRP $45.00 (inc GST) 

September 2017 

This tri-lingual book (English, Portuguese, Chinese) includes a series of poetic texts by Brian Castro and artworks by John Young, which both engage their shared histories of Macau. It also offers an introductory letter by Edward Colless and a response from Paul Carter. Castro’s text, titled Macau Days: Or Six Characters in Search of a Dish, is structured like a meal and traditional Macanese recipes accompany his texts. Young’s artworks—paintings, chalk drawings and montages as well as stunning photographs of the Macanese dishes—are dispersed throughout the texts. 

Macau, as a place, has gone through fundamental metamorphosis over the course of half a millennium. Beginning as a merchant port of refuge and fisherman’s haven, to a gateway for the Jesuit missionaries, and as the nineteenth an twentieth century Modernism of a Portuguese province; where poets and artists from the west and China traversed, and transformed their own orientation in becoming transcultural individuals. Now Macau is defined as a phantasmagoric site for gambling, housing more than 38 casinos, rivalling Las Vegas. These changes have been brought metaphorically into the conditions of the cultural world today. 

Supported by the J.M. Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice, EU Centre for Global Affairs, University of Adelaide and University of Melbourne, VCA.